Home / news / “The Des Moines Register” declare : Magellan has 28 pipeline spills in Iowa. Will Dakota Access do better?

“The Des Moines Register” declare : Magellan has 28 pipeline spills in Iowa. Will Dakota Access do better?

collected by :Maolly Tony

referring to

Dakota Access opponents say accidents involving Magellan and other operators demonstrate the risks associated with the Dakota Access pipeline, the largest ever to cross Iowa.
Pipeline spills often are caused by third parties, such as a farmer or contractor digging near a line.
Magellan, based in Tulsa, Okla., said the 12-inch diesel pipeline that ruptured near Hanlontown was built in the early 1950s.
In addition to the most recent spill in Worth County, DNR data show that over the last 16 years Magellan has documented 27 pipeline spills, 18 spills at pipeline facilities and two while performing pipeline maintenance.
In 2003, a failed gasket resulted in 1,650 gallons of diesel pouring from a 10-inch Magellan pipeline onto Pottawatomie County soil.

according to

“We put you heavy into the pipeline business because we approved, as you know, the Keystone pipeline and Dakota, but they have to buy, meaning steel, so I’ll say U.S. steel, but steel made in this country and pipelines made in this country.”
The requirement to use U.S. steel would create challenges for TransCanada because much of the pipe for its Keystone XL project has already been manufactured.
President Donald Trump on Thursday said the companies behind two hotly contested oil pipelines must use U.S. steel in their projects.
The Commerce Department has not yet issued a report on the requirement, but Trump on Thursday said the companies behind the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines would “have to buy” pipes made from U.S. steel.
Trump told United States Steel CEO Mario Longhi during a meeting of business leaders at the White House.

Keystone, Dakota Access pipeline makers must buy US steel*/

according to

Meet the youths at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access pipeline

Meet the youths at the heart of the Standing Rock protests against the Dakota Access pipeline*/

Danny Grassrope of the Lower Brule Sioux and a 25-year-old member of the International Indigenous Youth Council was among them.
With the largest protest camps dispersed and construction resumed on the Missouri River crossing, opposition against the pipeline remains before the courts as the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes continue their legal challenges to the pipeline.
Evan Simon/ABC News“It’s not if it breaks, it’s when it breaks,” Alex Howland, a 21-year-old co-founder of the International Indigenous Youth Council, told ABC News.
Opposition against the Dakota Access pipeline shifted into a new phase this week after law enforcement in full riot gear evicted several protest camps that had captivated the nation for nearly a year.
The clearing of the Oceti Sakowin and Rosebud camps marked a somber moment of reflection for members of the International Indigenous Youth Council, a little known group of indigenous youths that has helped steer the movement from the very beginning.

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